Courses

Courses

Students choose their morning class from the two options below: Art 010 (GA) Introduction to Visual Studies or Biology 120A (GN) Plants, Places, and People. Each student then selects either Philosophy 132 (GH) Introduction to Bioethics OR Gaming 160 (GH) Introduction to Video Game Culture.

To enrich this experience, an holistic approach to college life will be available in the afternoons including workshops on campus resources and tools for a successful start in college.

Intro to Visual Studies
ART 010

Our Mobile-Selves, Instagram and Art uses the smart phones in our pockets and the social media we use every day to dig into two big questions; could Instagram be used to make meaningful socially aware art and how do we think about and use Instagram as a tool in our lives? In the course we examine how art connects to social media throughout history and how we think about art today.

Monday through Thursday
8:30 - 10:20 a.m.

Anthony Vega

Anthony Vega
Instructor in Arts and Humanities

 

Plants, Places, and People
BIOL 120A

We all experience plants every day in myriad ways. Some are obvious (eating lunch, smelling a rose), some require a little reflection (getting dressed, taking aspirin), and some may be totally off our radar (breathing oxygen, drinking clean water). This course will explore all those human-plant interactions throughout history and around the world. We will start with a little basic botany, then move on to plant uses, from food staples to psychoactive drugs, fabric to lumber, medicines to poisons. You’ll share your favorite plant with the class and role-play about controversial issues, like legalizing marijuana and genetic engineering. Join us!

Monday through Thursday
8:30 - 10:20 a.m.

Mark Boudreau

Mark Boudreau
Instructor in Biology 

 

 

 

Intro to Bioethics
PHIL 132

Introduction to Bioethics provides a critical survey of key concepts, problems, and figures in the short history of Bioethics. The course will develop the student’s analytical skills through study of different views on the nature of life and what experimentation with life-forms morally entails. The course will examine the arguments and practices entailed by the increasingly techno-scientific definition of the nature of life and the human condition. It will investigate the extent and breadth of moral arguments in relation to biotechnology research and implementation, genetic engineering, medicine, and more fundamental questions regarding animal, including human, rights.

Monday through Thursday
10:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.

Mark Westmoreland

Mark Westmoreland
Instructor in Philosophy 

 

 

Intro to Video Game Culture
GAME 160

In 50 years, video and computer games have progressed from whimsical experiments conducted by computer scientists to a multibillion-dollar industry that helps define the landscape of modern culture. This class will examine the history, philosophy, and impact of video games on economics, art, popular culture, and society. Be prepared to take a serious look at a supposedly frivolous phenomenon as we study how video games have changed the way we think about books, movies, sports, education, and basic human interactions. Be ready to ponder some hard questions about the impact of video games on real-world behaviors like violence and gender relations. Finally, expect to synthesize what you have learned and create a proposal for a video game of your own design. Students will not need to know much about computers or coding, as this class will be studying video games as cultural artifacts rather than technological one.

Monday through Thursday
10:30 a.m. - 12:20 p.m.

Max Guerin

Max Guerin
Instructor in American Studies