GS Courses

GS Courses

Spring 2017

Below, please find very specific GS course content together with specific learning outcomes regarding some of the campus’ popular general education courses offered next semester. For a complete list of general education course list, please contact your adviser or visit the LionPATH site.

COMMUNICATIONS

COMM 100 (GS)
The Mass Media and Society
When is the last time you checked social media? How much TV did you watch over the weekend? What is the last song you streamed? Odds are, if you are like most Americans today, you are constantly connected to some type of media device. After all, media are everywhere today. We browse the web. We watch TV. We read books. We listen to music. Yet, where did these media that we take for granted come from? This class explores the backgrounds of various media, and explains how they have come together in a modern world of media convergence.

CRIMINAL JUSTICE

CRIMJ 13 (GS)
Juvenile Delinquency
This course is designed to teach students the evolution of the juvenile justice system in the United States, and specifically look at the main areas of law enforcement, the court system, and corrections. Students will learn what makes children and adolescents more vulnerable, or “at risk,” for breaking the law. The different categories, classifications, and definitions of delinquent acts will be discussed, as well as theories about why juveniles commit crimes and the consequences that may come along with the delinquent act. The main differences between the criminal justice system and the juvenile justice system are discussed, as well as methods of crime prevention. Current cases and events will be reviewed, as they relate to the juvenile justice field as they arise.

CRIMJ 100 (GS)
Intro to Criminal Justice
This course is designed to teach students a brief history of the field of criminal justice, and how it has evolved over time due to the changing needs of society. The course will discuss the main areas of the criminal justice system, including law enforcement, the court system, and corrections. Students will learn about the different categories, classifications, and definitions of criminal acts, as well as theories about why people commit crimes and the consequences that may be a result of committing a criminal act. Current events in the United States and crime prevention will also be discussed, as they relate to the criminal justice field.

GAMING

GAME 140 (GS)
Gaming and Interactive Media
Do you want to know more about a multibillion-dollar industry that is ingrained in our culture and is increasingly infiltrating our lives? The video game industry is a major competitor in the interactive media/entertainment business, which boasts revenues greater than theatrical film exhibition and recorded music sales combined. This global industry is rapidly growing and the largest players are running multibillion-dollar, multinational operations employing thousands of people.

Join a guild in this “gamified” course that explores the exciting world of digital interactive media highlighting such topics as: video games and simulations, products for education, training, medicine, business, government/military and virtual environments for a range of applications. Students will learn about industry structures, basic economics, business models, work flow, types of enterprises, job descriptions, and opportunities. It examines both the national and global markets. It provides students with a factually and theoretically informed appreciation of these industries.

The course will build on the students’ personal and social experiences of these media, which extends to research on current trends in the industry. It is not a course about playing or designing games or mastering individual applications. No special knowledge or experience in playing video games, using “serious games” or experiencing virtual worlds is required. It will provide students with the foundation to make a well-informed choice about careers in this sector and respond to their natural curiosity about this pervasive part of their lives. 

HUMAN DEVELOPMENT AND FAMILY STUDIES

HD FS 129 (GS)
Introduction to Human Development and Family Studies
This course provides an introduction to interdisciplinary scholarship concerned with how human beings develop— physically, emotionally and intellectually— throughout their lives that is situated within particular sociocultural contexts.

HD FS 229 (GS)
Infant and Child Development
Have you ever wondered what that little baby in front of you is actually thinking or why the toddler in your family will throw things over his high chair over, and over, and over again? In this class, we explore how fetuses, infants, and children learn about the world around them — from learning about what they think, to how they move and when they start to feel emotions such as love, guilt, or jealousy. We also explore how the contexts of development (e.g., family, community, culture, etc) impact how we grow from a single-cell to a living, breathing (and sometimes annoying) child.

HD FS 239 (GS)
Adolescent Development
Only in early infancy do minds, bodies, and abilities change as radically as they do during the teenage years. This course is an introductory course that explores the developmental processes that shape our lives between puberty and the end of college. Although each life unfolds in its own unique pattern, we will explore the ways biological, psychological, and sociological influences systematically combine to shape its course. This class will help to develop an understanding of the concepts, methods, and research findings central to the study of adolescent development. Special consideration is given to topics relevant to Penn State Brandywine students.

INFORMATION SCIENCES AND TECHNOLOGY

IST 110 (GS)
Information, People, and Technology
The course focuses on an action-oriented approach where students learn by doing, and is delivered with significant student interaction with technology both in class and as part of out-of-class assignments.

Three perspectives address the core issues in the course: information or the basic science of data encoding, transmission, and storage; people or the interactions among technologies, institutions, regulations, and users; and technology or the design and operation of basic information technology devices. Students completing the course will be confident users and consumers of information technology while developing research and analytical skills.

IST 110 is the introductory course in IST, and it is a required course for all IST majors and minors.  

POLITICAL SCIENCE

PL SC 14 (GS, IL)
International Politics
This course introduces students to the major concepts and pertinent history of international relations within the framework of “strategic history.” The course requires extensive class participation and attendance is very important. Students will be expected to read and to discuss assigned texts and current events relevant to the subject matter of the course.

PSYCHOLOGY

PSYCH 212 (GS)
Introduction to Developmental Psychology
Have you ever wondered what that little baby in front of you is actually thinking or why the toddler in your family will throw things over his high chair over, and over, and over again? In this class, we explore how fetuses, infants, and children learn about the world around them - from learning about what they think, to how they move and when they start to feel emotions such as love, guilt, or jealousy. We also explore how the contexts of development (e.g., family, community, culture, etc) impact how we grow from a single-cell to a living, breathing (and sometimes annoying) child.

PSYCH 238 (GS)
Introduction to Personality Psychology
The purpose of this course is to make yourself familiar with major theories of personality and current personality research. By the end of the semester, you will be able to answer the questions, “What is personality?” and “What determines personality?” As you will see, these are questions that many scholars have struggled to answer throughout time, and while there is no one correct answer, there are some fundamentals that are generally accepted by psychologists today. To these basic theoretical perspectives, you will add your own opinions and ideas during the course of the semester.

PSYCH 253 (GS)
Introduction to Psychology of Perception
This course provides an overview of human perception, which is the process of taking in and processing information from the environment. The well-studied domains of vision and audition are discussed in depth, but tactile and chemical senses, and complex behaviors involving perception (e.g., language, attention) are discussed. For each sense, we complete laboratory activities to illustrate how our senses affect our real-world behaviors.

REHABILITATION AND HUMAN SERVICES

RHS 100 (GS)
Introduction to Disability Culture
Introduction to disability culture explores how culture affects disability. It seeks to answer questions such as: What is a disability? How is disability perceived and treated in the United States and in other countries? How do concepts of universal design improve environments for all? 

SECURITIES AND RISK ANALYSIS

SRA 111 (GS)
Security and Risk Analysis
The overarching course goal is for students to understand, communicate, and make informed decisions relating to virtual and physical security in a variety of small and large environments. As a class, we will explore security needs for individuals, singular computers and home networks. We will compare and contrast the security needs of businesses and even nations versus individuals.