GA Courses

GA Courses

Spring 2017

Below, please find very specific GA course content together with specific learning outcomes regarding some of the campus’ popular general education courses offered next semester. For a complete list of general education course list, please contact your adviser or visit the LionPATH site.

ART

ART 001 (GA)
Introduction to Visual Arts
(Intro to Watercolor)

This course will introduce students to the watercolor medium with an emphasis on the fundamentals of composition, value, color mixing, and watercolor techniques. Through the exploration of the watercolor medium, students will have the opportunity to practice basic wet and dry techniques, washes, blends, and use of transparency as they develop and complete their watercolor paintings. This is an introductory course. No prior painting experience is required.

ART 010 (GA)
Introduction to Visual Studies
Our Mobile-Selves, Instagram and Art, uses the smart phones in our pockets and the social media we use every day to dig into two big questions; could Instagram be used to make meaningful socially aware art and how do we think about and use Instagram as a tool in our lives? In the course we examine how art connects to social media throughout history and how we think about art today. We ask questions like, why is Kim K. so popular, what’s up with all the food pictures, and the impact of selfies on our world. You will learn and utilize what makes Instagram posts look good and how they get shared. Ultimately, this course is about discovering how to ask more of ourselves and others through posting images via Instagram and the act of making art and questioning that in an academic setting. In this course you will not only learn how to take and post really well constructed Instagram feeds, but those posts will offer a more significant and potentially progressive social contribution and exploration of our world.

This course is a collaborative learning, critical thinking, and problem solving course using digital media as a tool for social exploration that is applicable across disciplines, interests, and concentrations.

ART 020 (GA)
Introduction to Drawing
Drawing is a course built upon a traditional, observation-based approach to drawing. Our primary source is the human figure (nude models). Still life, landscape, and portraiture are also considered. Development of gestalt (the psychology of implied shape), space, figure-ground, and perspective are active components in this course. Materials are of a time-honored nature. Mainly, monochromatic "dry mediums," charcoal, conte crayon, chalk, etc. This course is taught at an introductory level and is predominantly technique-driven. Our student drawings, while based upon traditional approaches, are made in a Post-postmodern environment. What we gain from the lessons of antiquity, colliding with the pastiche of "the here and now."

ART 050 (GA)
Introduction to Painting
Painting is a course built upon a traditional, observation-based approach to painting. Our primary source is the still life. The course content has been constructed from the “nature morte” works of Giorgio Morandi. Development of gestalt (the psychology of implied shape), space, figure-ground, perspective, and color theory are active components in this course. Materials are of a time-honored nature. Mainly, acrylic paints, brushes, quality paper, sketchbooks, etc. This course is taught at an introductory level and is predominantly technique-driven. Our student paintings, while based upon traditional approaches, are made in a Post-postmodern environment. What we gain from the lessons of antiquity, colliding with the pastiche of the “here and now."

MUSIC

MUSIC 009 (GA)
Introduction to World Music
(Music, Conflict, and Peace Building)

This course surveys ways in which music is involved in conflict and conflict resolution. Topics include African war drumming; musical revitalization in Cambodia after war and the Khmer Rouge genocide; drumming in Caribbean anti-colonial uprisings; American popular music and the civil rights movement; and heavy metal in Nepal, Israel, and Serbia. How does music strengthen division or galvanize a people for war? How does music reconcile, voice concerns, or (re-) build identity? How might music be a vehicle of peace building and resolution? Other topics include: music and gender, intellectual property, intangible cultural heritage, and the politics of representation.

THEATRE

THEA 105 (GA)
Introduction to Theatre: How Theatre Happens
We sit in a darkened room and while actors share stories, expressing dreams and fears, we recognize ourselves. When we leave, we have made a connection to our world, for good or ill, which is profoundly personal. Theater is a vital part of the cultural landscape in which it is created, a way of understanding our world and ourselves in real time, live, and in person. In this course, we examine the elements of the theatrical production process as a means of both understanding how and why theater works and developing a greater appreciation of the art and the craft of theater. We’ll explore the historical, analytical, and practical aspects of the Western theatrical tradition, through production videos, lecture, and in-class activities. 

THEA 208 (GA)
Workshop: Theatre in Diverse Cultures
In this class we will explore the broad cultural diversity that exists in artistic expression and production and how that diversity is making its way onto Western onto stage and screen.  We will focus on the differences between cultural influences and cultural appropriation, and on the efforts of women, the LGBT community, and people of color to get their stories told both onstage and in film.  Looking primarily at Western theatre performances and texts, we will examine the theatrical traditions that have paradoxically both encouraged us to and prevented us from fully embracing the rich cultural diversity of our performers and audiences.  Our goals are to develop and enhance an appreciation for multicultural theatrical presentations; to help sensitize students to the need for a broader cultural diversity in theatrical and film performance; and to provide students with a broader understanding of, and engagement with, drama.