INTEGRATIVE ARTS 1

 

INTRODUCTION TO THE ARTS

 

IN CHINA

 

 

Dr. Paul Greene

  • email: pdg4@psu.edu

Email is the best way to contact me.

  • tel.: 610.892.1474

 

Tour agency: Celestial Voyagers, led by Francoise Cornu

  • tel.: 516.829.1525
  • email: info@celestialvoyagers.com
  • www.celestialvoyagers.com

Pennsylvania State University

Brandywine Global Programs

 

Spring 2014

 

 

Timeline:

 

March 5, 2014                       5:00 PM         All Pre-travel Assignments are due to the Angel drop box for this course

 

March 7-15                                                    Travel and immersion experience in China, working with your instructor and the tour agency.

 

May 5                                     10:00 AM      Journal of Arts Experiences and all Post-travel Assignments are due to the Angel drop box for this course.

 

 

Welcome to the exciting worlds of the arts in Beijing, Shanghai and Xian. In this course, we will explore means of expression and communication that involve sound, space, color, and shape. We will reflect on and carefully analyze what is being communicated through these media. We will learn and use aesthetic terminology which will function as our tools to discuss the arts, and we will learn to consider artworks within a framework of Chinese art history.

 

This course is not designed to test your artistic background, nor your skills in music-making, drawing, or acting. Instead, it is an introduction to the arts that targets your ability to consider and verbally discuss what meanings and functions an artwork takes on in our lives, and how it relates to other artworks in aesthetic traditions in China. The course will not tell you what is "good" or "bad" art, but instead invite you to decide this for yourself, in relation to artistic traditions that have been cultivated over many centuries in China.

 

No previous experience with music, sculpture or architecture is required. No previous travel to China or Asia is required. The only prerequisites are an interest in the arts and a willingness to participate constructively and professionally in a course that includes a short-term immersion experience in China.

 

 

REQUIRED FOR THIS COURSE:

     Email and ANGEL. Course communication will take place via email, using your Penn State email account, and through the Penn State online learning environment Angel (www.angel.psu.edu). Plan to check your email regularly. Also, many assignments require you to search or find information on the Internet. Students should also be prepared to work through the Penn State online environment of Angel, for access to important course resources and information. I recommend that you configure Angel so that it forwards messages from that environment to your regular email, so that you can be sure to stay up to date.

 

     Register for this course by February 7, 2014. Registration for this course is not possible through the usual online methods. What is required is my signature on a Drop/Add form, or an email message from me in which I write to the campus Registrar specifically to grant you permission. Contact me: pdg4@psu.edu. You will also need a similar permission statement from your academic adviser. University policy Registering for the course does not sign you up for the trip or arrange your airfare; you have to make all such arrangements with the tour agency directly.

 

     Register with the Tour Agency. Have you contacted the tour agent to make arrangements for travel? Delays can result in higher fares or possibly make travel impossible. Celestial Voyagers, telephone: 516.829.1525, email: info@celestialvoyagers.com. They will ask that you have your passport. A passport number is required in order to purchase an international air ticket. US citizens can arrange for passports through the Media Courthouse, http://www.co.delaware.pa.us/ojs/passport.html; 201 W. Front St., Government Center 123, Media, PA. Renewing or creating a passport takes several weeks, although this can be expedited for a fee.

 

     Camera. To complete the Journal of Arts Experiences, you will need a camera. You will need to arrange for a picture of yourself to be taken at sites that you visit, as proof that your papers are grounded in actual, first-hand experiences in the arts. I recommend digital format because this will make it easier for you to submit your Journal electronically, and to type in explanations below each photo. A good smartphone camera is fine. Note: electricity is 220 volts in China, and there are four different types of outlets.

 

     Blank notebook in which to keep a daily journal of arts experience while you are in China. A standard spiral notebook of 8.5 x 11 pages is fine, or electronic equivalent.

 

    Travel Guidebook to China (recommended but not absolutely required): You will be traveling around China in pursuit of artistic experiences, and so, to supplement the guidance of Celestial Voyagers, it is very helpful to have a guidebook that introduces you to the city, offers cultural background, and clarifies the best ways to get to key sites. Different guidebooks have different strengths and weaknesses. A useful guidebook should include maps, listings of architectural sites, museums, theatres, and concert venues, a good index, and pages containing background cultural and historical information.

 

ABOUT THIS COURSE

 

This course is delivered using distance education technologies combined with short-term travel-immersion, using inquiry-based learning (defined below). Students must be fluent in distance learning technologies of email and the Penn State University Angel environment. Regarding Pre-travel and Post-travel Assignments, please feel free to email me with any questions or concerns as they arise. Please also check your email frequently for course- and travel-related messages. I prefer that you turn in all assignments to the Angel drop box for this course. Please submit all documents as Microsoft Word documents. My computer cannot read Word Perfect documents.

 

 

COURSE REQUIREMENTS

 

InArt 1 is based on a total of 100 points, valuated according to the following scale: 95+: A, 90+: A-, 87+: B+, 83+: B, 80+: B-, 75+: C+, 70+: C, 60+: D, below 60: F.

 

 

Pre-travel Assignments:

15 points

1. History of Chinese Landscape Painting

 

10 points

2. Terminology in the Arts of China

 

5 points

3. Musical Concepts and Terminology Worksheet

 

5 points

4. Inquiry

 

 

To be Done During the Trip:

15 points

Journal of Arts Experiences

 

 

Post-travel Assignments:

15 points

1. Aesthetic Experience Paper: Artistic Movements

 

15 points

2. Aesthetic Experience paper: Architecture

 

10 points

3. Aesthetic Experience paper: Music

 

 

10 points

Community Contribution Grade

 

All late materials will be penalized one letter grade (10 of the 100 total assignment points) for lateness, and an additional letter grade per subsequent day of lateness.

 

 

 

Community Contribution Grade:

Welcome to Penn State Brandywine Global Programs! You are invited to join and build our traveling community as we study abroad together. As part of your travel experience, you will be required not only to work with your instructor to complete the assignments specified in the syllabus, but also to contribute to your traveling community as we all work together to make the most of our shared intellectual experience.

 

 

Your Community Contribution Grade: In addition to completing papers, projects and workshops, 10% of your course grade will be a Community Contribution grade, reflecting your overall contributions to your travel abroad community. In general, your Community Contribution grade will reflect what you do to make this trip an effective and exciting intellectual experience for your community of fellow travelers. A key component of this grade will be four required community meetings over breakfast, in which you meet with your colleagues and instructor to share your experiences and insights. Here are some other factors that will impact your Community Contribution grade: Have your collaborated with one of your colleagues in locating and visiting a museum, performance event, historic sight, etc.? Have you discovered opportunities of sites to visit to meet your course requirements, and shared them with your colleagues (perhaps at a breakfast meeting)? Please note that activities that detract from the traveling community's intellectual experience carry penalties. For example, failing to follow instructions from the travel agent or the instructors in the program (including instructors of courses other than your own) could result in a penalty to your Community Contribution grade. Likewise, violation of Penn State University's Code of Conduct, excessive drunkenness, or violation of the country's laws or customs will be met with severe penalties. Additional penalties may be assigned to you and your academic record by the university's Judicial Affairs office. For more information refer to the Brandywine Global Programs Student Handbook.

 

OPTIONAL BLOG ASSIGNMENT: Prior to travel, there will be an introduction to blogging by a Brandywine Campus University Relations officer. Following those guidelines, develop blog texts, photographs, and/or videos to document your experience abroad. A goal is to collect photographs and videos showing active learning at sites in China. The Community Contribution Grade is worth 10 points; however depending on the content and volume of blog information you provide, you may acquire an additional 0 to 5 bonus points to contribute to your overall course grade. Dialog with your instructor to learn more.

 

 

PRE-TRAVEL ASSIGNMENTS:

 

1. History of Chinese Landscape Painting: 750 words

Write an essay of at least 750 words in which you trace the history of landscape painting in China from at least the Song period to the present day. What expressive aims motivate the artists in each phase? What are the key differences among the difference phases? Who are the most famous or significant artists? Be sure to describe the landscape painting idiom in terms of the paper and format used (e.g., scrolls). You may wish to include comparative observations to the arts of calligraphy, sculpture and architecture. In order to write this essay, you will need to situate landscape painting traditions within the timeline of Chinese dynasties (Han, Song, Tang, Qing, etc.)

 

Be sure to cite all sources (if you wish to cite books, websites or articles, I recommend formats specified in the MLA Handbook of Style or Chicago Manuel of Style).

 

2. Terminology in the Arts of China

Give definitions of each of the following terms, clarifying their relevance to the arts in China. Each definition should be 5-6 sentences in length, and should be entirely in your own words. Please turn in all definitions together in a single document.

 

Army of Terracotta Warriors

blue and white wares

Buddhism

Chinese tea house

Confucianism

Cui Jian

Cultural Revolution

dzi

rh

feng shui

flung ink style

Forbidden City

Great Wall of China

harmony under Confucius

jade (y)

Jade Buddha Temple

jingju

Lama Temple

Muslim Quarter of Xian

Oriental Pearl Tower

qin

pipa

Qin Shi Huang

 

Shanghai World Financial Center

shufa

sizhu

Tang-period landscape painting

Taoism

three-colored wares

Tian Tan Gongyuan

Xie He

yangqin

Yuyuan Garden

 

3. Musical Concepts and Terminology Worksheet

Study the Toolkit of Musical Terms included with this syllabus. At the end of this Toolkit document is a Musical Concepts and Terminology Worksheet. Please copy the text of this worksheet into a new Microsoft Word document, and fill in the blanks. When you fill in the blanks, please underline your inserted answers. Then submit the new document to me as one of your Pre-travel Assignments.

 

4. Inquiry

After you have completed all the other pre-travel assignments, design an inquiry that will guide your explorations into the arts in China. An inquiry is defined as a topic that you are interested in combined with a question. For any given area of study, such as the Visual Arts in China, you probably have at least one topic that you are interested in. Now that you have completed the other pre-travel assignments, you have a general introduction to certain key concepts and artworks. So, what particularly interests you? Is there an artwork, theme, era, artist, or artistic school that seems especially intriguing? Commonly this is an easy question to answer, though in some cases it may require additional examination or exploration. You can dialog with me about interests you have that are not included in the Terminology in the Arts of China.

            Next: is there a question you would like to answer about this topic? The question should be broad-reaching and not narrow or focused. Examples include: how did this artwork fit into the lives of people at the time? Or, what would it be like to view the whole world in the way suggested by this artistic movement? Or, how does music by this composer organize or give shape to emotions or feelings, and what does that tell us about this culture?

            Your inquiry will guide you during your travel-immersion experience, and in the writing of your post-travel papers. So, it is a good idea to develop an inquiry that genuinely grows out of your own interests, and that includes a question that is interesting to explore. Feel free to dialog with me about your inquiry to make sure your inquiry will serve you well in this course. We will continue to reflect on our inquiries over breakfast meetings abroad, and you should plan to write each inquiry at the top of each post-travel paper. Your inquiry can evolve as you learn more. If this happens, be sure to document how and why this has happened in your Journal of Arts Experiences.

 

 

TO BE DONE DURING THE TRIP:

 

Journal of Arts Experiences. First of all, please read carefully the Post-travel Assignments. The primary purpose of your work in China is to prepare yourself to complete these Post-travel Assignments. Therefore, it is crucial that you understand the assignments so you can collect the relevant information and explore the appropriate experiences of the arts. To this end, you are to keep a Journal of Arts Experiences, in which you to take notes on your arts-related activities and experiences while in China.

 

Also, be sure you have a well-articulated inquiry from your pre-travel coursework. I expect you to explore your inquiry abroad and in your post-travel papers.

 

Take a blank notebook or electronic equivalent with you as you go about China. Keep your notes in the form of a travel log, specifying day, time of day, the museum, place, or concert you are visiting, and details about your experiences. You can keep this Journal in hand-written form: it is not necessary to type this up. For each site you visit, write at least one paragraph of notes. Include photographs.

 

Describe in detail what you experience. How does this artwork make you feel? Take specific notes about the artwork. If it is music, take notes using the musical terminology you have learned. If it is visual arts, take notes on the colors, textures, shapes, and so on. If it is architecture, reflect on how it fits into the environment. For each site, try to relate your experience to the terminology and arts movements that you have learned about in your Pre-travel Assignments. Also, feel free to mention in your Journal any contextual factors that may influence your experience of the arts, such as your mood that day, who you may be traveling with, the weather, etc. You will be using you Journal to help you complete the Post-travel Assignments, and then you will turn in your Journal together with these Post-travel Assignments.

 

To complete your Journal you will need to have a photograph taken of yourself at each site, as proof that your coursework is based on authentic, firsthand experiences in the arts of China. It is helpful to travel about China with colleagues in this course so they can take your picture. Museums do not allow photographs to be taken inside, so in the case of museums please arrange for yourself to be photographed just outside the entrance to the building.

 

When you turn in your Journal, be sure to include these photographs. Each photo should be accompanied with a label that explains the site. So, if you are taking digital photos, then, if possible, I would request that you first downscale the images to website resolution (makes the file size small enough that my email wont slow down to a crawl, but still has adequate resolution), then paste them into a Word document, and write a short (1-sentence) explanation below each image. If you are taking non-digital photos, then collect them in a photo album format and include a handwritten or typed label explanation next to each photo. You can put together the photos and text of the Journal after you return from China.

 

You are required to have, in your Journal, at least a one-paragraph description of each of the following:

 

Your journal should also include a daily status report on your exploration of your inquiry. At the end of every day, write a paragraph on your inquiry. What have you learned today to answer your inquiry? What challenges have you faced? Are there ways in which you feel your inquiry may be evolving? How, and why? This is an important part of the Journal assignment.

 

Turn in your Journal of Arts Experiences together with your Post-travel Assignments.

 

 

POST-TRAVEL ASSIGNMENTS:

 

Aesthetic Experience Paper: Artistic Movements: 1,000 words (4 pages)

Aesthetics may be defined as the study of sensory and/or emotional values of artistic expressions, which may be in any medium: visual, musical, theatrical, etc. An aesthetic experience paper is a paper in which you do the following: 1) describe artworks in detail; 2) situate the artworks within the traditions and movements that gave rise to them; 3) reflect on the artwork-in-tradition and explore what it means to you, what feelings and associations it inspires, and what may be the unique ways in which this artwork can be expressive, or the unique kinds of things the artwork can express. In other words, it is an opportunity for you to reflect on the artwork in its tradition, and on what unique contribution it makes to the entire world of human expressions.

 

For the Aesthetic Experience Paper on Artistic Movements, you are to describe and compare 6 paintings or sculptures. These should be artworks you have seen in China and documented in your Journal of Arts Experiences. Be sure to mention the name, artist, and museum for each painting. Clarify why each painting is an example of its tradition, in terms of specific qualities of the artwork. What is the unique kind of expression that each artwork makes? What does the artwork add to the whole world of human artistic expression? Why is this artwork valuable?

 

At the top of your paper, state your inquiry. In the closing section of your paper, you are to answer this inquiry. Draw on your pre-travel paper on Artistic Movements, your Terminology in the Arts in China, your Journal of Art Experiences, and any additional research to formulate a viable response or answer. It may not be possible to answer your inquiry fully or decisively for all time. In fact a good inquiry may be an ongoing question that resists conclusive answering. Accordingly, a grading criterion for this paper will be how effectively you have pursued your inquiry, how much you have learned in the process, and how much you have genuinely sought to answer it.

 

Aesthetic Experience Paper: Architecture: 750 words (3 pages)

For this paper, you are to describe and compare 4 examples of architecture. These should be pieces of architecture that you have visited in China and documented in your Journal of Arts Experiences. Your experience should include detailed notes of being both inside and outside the architecture (if inside is possible). Do some research to learn the history of each piece of architecture, and what artistic movements it fits into. In your paper, describe each piece of architecture and explain how it fits into its artistic movement and era. Be sure to cite all sources (if you wish to cite books, websites or articles, I recommend formats specified in the MLA Handbook of Style or Chicago Manuel of Style). Then address the following questions:  What is the unique kind of expression that each piece of architecture makes? What does the architecture add to the whole world of human artistic expression? Why is this  architecture valuable?

 

At the top of your paper, state your inquiry on  architecture. In the closing section of your paper, you are to answer this inquiry, in terms of architecture. Draw on your pre-travel paper on Artistic Movements, your Terminology in the Arts in China, Journal of Art Experiences, and any additional research to formulate a viable response or answer. It may not be possible to answer your inquiry fully or decisively for all time. In fact a good inquiry may be an ongoing question that resists conclusive answering. Accordingly, a grading criterion for this paper will be how effectively you have pursued your inquiry, how much you have learned in the process, and how much you have genuinely sought to answer it.

 

Aesthetic Experience Paper: Music: 750 words (3 pages)

For this paper, you are to describe and compare two examples of music that you experience in China. Both pieces can be from the same concert or music event. For this assignment, it is important to analyze examples of live music-making. A paper based on analyzing a recording—even one that you purchased in China—will lose points.

 

Begin by describing each piece of music. Be sure to mention the name of the piece (if known), the musician or composer, and the place where you experienced it. Then, describe the music using the musical terminology you learned in your Pre-travel work. Be sure to use at least 12 of the following 24 terms, which are from the Toolkit of Musical Terms.

 

melody, non-metric, homophonic, timbre, polyphonic, dissonant, chord, scale, consonant, blue note, vibrato, rhythm, pentatonic, non-pitched, treble, tempo, sustain, bass, heptatonic, monophonic, pitched, meter, register, interval

 

Do some research on the music tradition that each piece of music exemplifies. In your paper, explain what music tradition the piece represents, and define the musical tradition and era. Be sure to cite all sources (if you wish to cite books, websites, articles, or recordings, I recommend formats specified in the MLA Handbook of Style or Chicago Manuel of Style).

 

At the top of your paper, state your inquiry. In the closing section of your paper, you are to answer this inquiry, as it relates to music. Draw on your pre-travel paper on Artistic Movements, Journal of Art Experiences, the Toolkit of Musical Terms, and any additional research to formulate a viable response or answer. It may not be possible to answer your inquiry fully or decisively for all time. In fact a good inquiry may be an ongoing question that resists conclusive answering. Accordingly, a grading criterion for this paper will be how effectively you have pursued your inquiry, how much you have learned in the process, and how much you have genuinely sought to answer it.

 

Useful resources:

 

 

Inquiry-Based Learning on the China Program

 

Paul D. Greene

 

Inquiry-based learning is an approach to education that is based on, and taps into, each student's unique interests and curiosities, in order to drive the learning process. In this approach, an inquiry is defined as a topic that a student is interested in combined with a question. For any given area of study, you probably have at least one topic that you are interested in, more or less from the start. And, assuming this is true, you probably also have at least one question that you would like to know the answer to. Since key concepts, themes and approaches in any area of study are interconnected, there are many possible inquiries that could serve as a viable point of entry into the field of study. Therefore, it is feasible to offer a student considerable freedom of choice in terms of how to enter or begin exploring the field. Once a student makes an inquiry and approaches the field of study with a genuine interest, learning can be guided to draw out the interconnections, leading to both breadth and depth of understanding of the field. Inquiry-based learning is closely related to inquiry-guided learning; for more on this approach see Virginia S. Lee, ed., Teaching and Learning Through Inquiry: A Guidebook for Institutions and Instructors, Stylus Publishing, 2004.

 

In a course rooted in inquiry-based learning, the instructor does not prescribe in-depth study of a range of topics, themes or analytic methods. Instead, the approach involves a brief overview of an approved set of topics, themes and/or methods, and it is up to the student to choose from among them for more in-depth study. Within an area of study, such as the arts in China, important topics and themes can be understood to be interconnected, and to comprise a network, or a "web of significance" (in the sense of anthropologist Clifford Geertz, The Interpretation of Cultures, Basic Books, 1973). Because concepts are interconnected in this way, there are many valid and effective points of entry into any field of inquiry. As much as possible, inquiry-based learning puts the student in charge of selecting the point(s) of entry to take to enter and explore the area of study. So in a course on the arts, it is the student who decides which artworks, styles or eras to explore in depth, from among an approved list. Since it is the student makes this selection, he or she likely has considerable interest in the artwork, style or era. This initial interest can power the inquiry and exploration process.

 

Inquiry-based learning: pre-travel coursework

A first step is for the student to develop an inquiry. Defining the terminology in the arts is a good way to survey important topics. After defining these terms, ask yourself, what particularly interests you? Is there an artwork, theme, era, or artistic school that seems especially intriguing? Commonly this is an easy question to answer, though in some cases it may require additional examination, additional exploration (you can dialog with me about interests you have that are not included in the terminology list), or even a random selection (though I hope it does not come to that!) Next: is there a question you would like to answer about this topic? The question should be broad-reaching and not narrow or focused. Examples include: how did this artwork fit into the lives of people at the time? Or, what would it be like to view the whole world in the way suggested by this artistic movement? Or, how does music by this composer organize or give shape to emotions or feelings, and what does that tell us about this culture? Develop an inquiry for each of the artistic traditions that you will be writing experience papers on: music, visual art (that is, painting and sculpture) and architecture. Feel free to dialog with me about your inquiry to make sure your inquiry will serve you well in this course.

 

For the arts in China, your inquiry should be broad enough to be addressed through the several arts: music, architecture, sculpture, painting and so on. This is so that your post-travel experience papers can build not only on your aesthetic experiences abroad, but also on your interests and pre-travel preparations. Design your inquiry after completing pre-travel coursework and before departure. Over our first breakfast meeting abroad, we will share and discuss our inquiries together, and so you will be expected to have inquiries designed by then. These discussions will be part of your Community Contribution grade.

 

Inquiry-based learning: coursework to be done abroad

While abroad, you'll be able to explore your inquiry in a much more direct, hands-on way. As you choose museums to visit, concerts to attend, and so on, consider how your new experiences may help you advance your progress in answering your inquiry. Write up these considerations in your journal, and discuss them with your classmates and me over breakfast. Also, as you learn and experience abroad, notice what surprises you. As you experience China directly, how do the unexpected or surprising aspects help you to respond to or perhaps shift your inquiry? Adjusting an inquiry in response to actual experiences abroad is a good thing: one of the benefits of education abroad is the way in which learning outside the classroom is different and more direct than on-campus learning. I encourage you to take your new experiences on board and allow them to guide you in rethinking or refining your inquiry.

 

Inquiry-based learning: post-travel coursework

I recommend that you state your inquiry at the top of each post-travel paper. The three post-travel assignments, more than any of the preceding stages, allow you to actually begin to formulate an answer to your inquiry. In your post-travel papers you will describe your experiences, drawing on journaling and photographs you took abroad. As you document your hands-on experiences, be sure to include: What did you learn by actually being abroad that you could not have learned in a classroom? What surprises or unexpected experiences have helped you to answer your inquiry? How has your inquiry evolved or shifted? If your inquiry shifts, then be sure to discuss this briefly (1-2 sentences should suffice) in your post-travel paper(s). And optionally, you may wish to consider in these papers what new inquiry you would now suggest, if you were to go back to China.

 

In addition, go back through the terminology you defined before travel. Now that you have explored your inquiry topic in some depth, how might you compare the topic you have focused on to these other topics? What is the unique contribution of your inquiry topic to the arts of China? How can your topic be understood in the broader context of history and culture? For these final papers, it is important to draw together as many forms of knowledge you have gained to deepen and demonstrate the depth and breadth of your aesthetic understanding. How well do you answer your inquiry? A sign of a strong paper is that it poses a clear inquiry and answers it fully, thoroughly, and in context.

 

 

STATEMENT ON ACADEMIC INTEGRITY

 

Academic Integrity: All students are expected to act with civility and personal integrity; respect other students' dignity, rights and property; and help create and maintain an environment in which all can succeed through the fruits of their own efforts.  An environment of academic integrity is requisite to respect for self and others and a civil community.

 

Academic integrity includes a commitment not to engage in or tolerate acts of falsification, misrepresentation or deception.  Such acts of dishonesty include cheating or copying, plagiarizing, submitting another persons' work as one's own, using Internet sources without citation, fabricating field data or citations, "ghosting" (taking or having another student take an exam), stealing examinations, tampering with the academic work of another student, facilitating other students' acts of academic dishonesty, etc.

 

Academic dishonesty violates the fundamental ethical principles of the University community and compromises the worth of work completed by others.  A student should avoid academic dishonesty when preparing work for any class.   If charged with academic dishonesty, students will receive written or oral notice of the charge by the instructor.   Students who contest the charge should first seek resolution through discussion with the faculty member or the campus Director of Academic Affairs.  If the matter is not resolved, the student may request a hearing with the University College Committee on Academic Integrity at the campus. 

 

Sanctions for breaches of academic integrity may range (depending on the severity of the offense) from F for the assignment to F for the course.   In severe cases of academic dishonesty, including, but not limited to, stealing exams or "ghosting" an exam, students may receive a grade of XF, a formal University disciplinary sanction that indicates on the student's transcript that failure in the course was due to a serious act of academic dishonesty.  The University's statement on Academic Integrity from which the above statement was drawn is available at:  http://www.psu.edu/dept/oue/aappm/G-9.html

 

Note about academic integrity and the papers and essays for this course: Your papers and terminology definitions must be 100% your own work. The penalty for academic integrity violation, even for just a portion of a paper or essay, is a 0 for the paper and possibly also an F or XF for the course, depending on the severity of the violation, as determined by the instructor.

 

 

NOTE TO STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES

 

In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, it is Penn States policy to provide reasonable academic adjustments for students with documented disabilities.  If you have a disability-related need for modifications in this course, contact Sharon Manco, 610-892-1461 or sam26@psu.edu.  This notification should occur by the end of the first week of the semester.  Students may visit www.equity.psu.edu/ods/ for complete information.